Another Journey Shared

Hello there!

This comment today lit a fire under me to write today’s post:

AnnIsikArts commented on Doucette_Liminal State.

Liminal State. 31 x 40″ Eco printed, painted, fused, appliqued; calligraphy. Cotton. $1000.

I like this a lot Janis. The doorway – two posts and a lintel. And the poetry running across the top. I read “… uplifted on the rising MIND, instead of WIND”, then thought that MIND worked just as well. This in particular of the series reminded me of the 20th century artist Winifred Nicholson. Her ‘prismatic’ paintings.

Ann recently wrote a post, a great read on Liminal Space as well.

Wow, Ann! Your comment took me on a journey since I was not acquainted with Winifred Nicholson’s work. I found that, indeed, I felt some common bond with her and her work. I think our heads were in just about the same place when she painted  Sandpipers Alnouth, 1933 at the Tate and when I painted the first Liminal Space. https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/nicholson-sandpipers-alnmouth-t05484 and http://winifrednicholson.com/seaandsky.html

I also related to this commentin the above site: “One may also venture to suggest that colour became her beacon because it happily straddled both positions as an intrinsic feature of the real world of objects and also as part of the vernacular of modernism.”   Christopher P Jones  https://medium.com/@chrisjones_32882/the-art-of-winifred-nicholson-a81788429119

          I know I’ve been enthralled with and influenced by 19th century French Impressionists and how they use color but given my small reach and limited market, many simply see my use of color as drab. I’d say that I am also strongly influenced by the American colorfield/expressionist painters of the early 40’s and 50’s. Still, I persist in my own unending/open-ended explorations.

I haven’t widely shown Liminal Space, the first in my series, because I have such mixed feelings about it. From a distance it does capture the essence of my intention but upon closer inspection, I’m not so pleased with my execution. It’s definitely one of those pieces I want to revisit.

Another of Nicholson’s paintings, Ullswater https://winifrednicholson.com/1940s.html reminds me of a piece that I either started in a class with Pam Allen or was inspired by the class (not sure) that sits waiting for me to develop it more, maybe to finish it or may be do a new one inspired by it.

More of Winifred Nicholson’;s paintings that I love:

Honeysuckle and Sweet Peas https://winifrednicholson.com/1940s.html

And this of Daybreak: http://winifrednicholson.com/landscapes.html

Charlotte’s Shells: http://winifrednicholson.com/landscapes.html

Belle Isle: http://winifrednicholson.com/allpaintings.html

Prismatic 5: http://winifrednicholson.com/cumberland.html

I hope you’ve enjoyed this journey with me and now I really must get back to my work at hand! I have quite a few new works in varying stages, but that will be later posts to watch for. Thanks for visiting with me!

One comment

  1. Yes, there’s a remarkable similarity between the ‘Liminal Space’ piece with portal and poetry and Nicholson’s Sandpipers, Alnmouth.

    You made an interesting choice of comparison there. I am originally from Northumberland and know Alnmouth well.

    I googled the painting and came not to the Tate Gallery page that displayed the work, but a different one displaying the work: ‘The Old Schoolhouse’ gallery. Curiously, I know an artist connected with that gallery who works with natural dyes and she grew some dye plants for me. I took delivery of them earlier this year and they are now flourishing in my garden. There’s some Dyer’s Chamomile, Sweet Cecily and Tansy.

    I just love stories that weave in and out of each other like this.

    Why anyone would consider your work ‘drab’ beats me. Sounds like jealousy. On the colour field painters: I like the work of Rothko, have two big prints of his in frames. Now this has been an interesting little journey. Ann

    Like

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